Green Lane, Dronfield, Derbyshire S18 2FZ | Contact Us | Tel: 01246 412372 | Email: admin@dronfield.derbyshire.sch.uk

Technology


Design and Technology: Vision Statement

Design and Technology is a valuable, enriching subject within today’s modern world and provides challenge and deep knowledge for all. It enables students to be successful by drawing upon knowledge learned across the curriculum so they can actively contribute to the creativity, culture, diversity, wealth and wellbeing of themselves, their community and the world in which they live.

Design and Technology: Design Rationale

Our curriculum is focussed on two main areas: Design and Technology and Food and Nutrition. Our big ideas of sustainability; material science; health and wellbeing; and provenance flow through each key stage.

In Design and Technology, students are encouraged to use their creativity and imagination, to design and make products that solve real and relevant problems within a variety of contexts. We look to draw upon the work of others throughout history, providing opportunities for them to critically reflect upon, evaluate and develop their designs.

In Food and Nutrition, students will develop their knowledge and understanding of food nutrition and health; food science; food safety; food choice and provenance. Along with this they will strengthen preparation skills and have a good understanding of hygiene, cooking techniques, and sensory characteristics.

There will be opportunities to draw upon and use their knowledge and skills from a wide range of other disciplines from across the school to give their learning purpose and relevance and enable thorough reflection of their work.

Big Ideas

The design and technology 'big ideas' encompass everything we deliver as part of our curriculum provision. Each is so important to students being successful in design and technology and support the whole school ethos of 'success with care'. The four big ideas are: Health and Well-being; Sustainability; Material Science; Provenance.

Big Ideas

Key Concepts

Working closely with the whole school 3 Rs, the faculty wanted to recognise and develop other key characteristics that a successful design and technology student should possess. We believe that through our varied and rich curriculum provision students should experience and explore these 6 Rs.

Key Concepts


Top

Facilities

The facilities provided within the faculty play an important part in encouraging our students to achieve in terms of making all possible opportunities accessible. Most rooms are used for specific material areas.

  • Food Preparation and Nutrition: E14, E15 and E22
  • Design and Technology - Textiles: E20, E23
  • Engineering: E17
  • Design and Technology – Resistant Materials: E18, E19, E21a, E21b
  • Product Design: E19
  • ICT Resources can be found in three areas in the faculty: E16, E20 and E25

Top

Key Stage 3

At Key Stage 3 our students are offered a wide variety of opportunities to access the design and technology national curriculum. Exciting and innovative, context driven schemes of work have been created to develop our student's abilities and creativity, providing sound skills and real world experiences ready for transition to Key Stage 4.

From Year 7 to Year 9, students access Design and Technology through specific material areas on a rotational basis for nine weeks each material area. The lessons are delivered in a double period format, with Year 7 having an additional single period lesson each week.

Students will also experience three Design and Technology Plus (DT+) modules within each year at KS3. Each module is just 3 weeks in length and offers students the opportunity to apply their knowledge and skills to a real-world problem or scenario.

Open All Close All

  • Year 7

    DT

    Context: The rate of greenhouse gases and carbon produced during the manufacture of predominantly plastic products is increasing.

    • How can the use of plastics be reduced?

    Students are given the task to assist a local toy manufacturer by designing and manufacturing an interactive toy which uses renewable resources and reduces plastic waste.

    Students consider what makes a good designer, exploring different ways of solving problems. Students design solutions and go onto manufacture their own individual design using the tools, equipment and machinery available in our extensive design and technology department. Students also develop their DT materials knowledge in the specialist areas: metals, timbers, plastics, electronics through focused theory lessons.

    DT Textiles

    Context: When designing a textiles product, it can be challenging to avoid design fixation.

    • Can you look to the work of others to inspire your designing and making whilst considering sustainability?

    As an introduction to textiles technology students are introduced to the textiles workshop and its health and safety, learning how to use tools and equipment safely whilst developing their dextrous skills. At its design core students work to understand the context of a range of different design movements within our cultural history and use this knowledge to develop their design ideas. Students undertake a practical make that allows them a explore sustainability using a range of techniques and processes to explore their creativity.

    Food Preparation and Nutrition

    Context:

    • Can you use the Eatwell Guide and a basic knowledge of nutrition and ingredients to help achieve a healthy balanced diet?

    As part of their work with food, pupils will be taught how to cook and apply the principles of nutrition and healthy eating. Instilling a love of cooking in pupils will also open a door to one of the great expressions of human creativity. Learning how to cook is a crucial life skill that enables pupils to feed themselves and others affordably and well, now and in later life. This includes:

    • Understanding and application of the principles of nutrition and health
    • Cooking a repertoire of predominantly savoury dishes so that they are able to feed themselves and others a healthy and varied diet
    • Becoming competent in a range of cooking techniques (for example, selecting and preparing ingredients; using utensils and electrical equipment; applying heat in different ways; using awareness of taste, texture and smell to decide how to season dishes and combine ingredients; adapting and using their own recipes)
    • Understanding the source, seasonality and characteristics of a broad range of ingredients

    DT+

    The DT+ modules in Design and Technology include 3-week modules that introduce important aspects that underpin other areas of the subject. In these modules' students have the opportunity to design and make using software, tools, equipment and machinery. Developing their awareness, abilities and appreciation for the designed world. In Y7 our DT+ is broken down into three projects;

    TinkerCAD

    Students are introduced to the world of TinkerCAD. They develop their understanding of the programme using the online lesson tutorials and then move onto the project context.

    Context: Landing on the lunar surface is very difficult because of the Moon’s lack of atmosphere; friction cannot be used to reduce speed and parachutes are of no use for the same reason. Very careful deceleration of the engines is required, landing gently on the rocky surface, avoiding possible destruction of the module or disturbing layers of dust that could affect instruments.

    • Imagine you are aerospace engineers. You must design and build a simple lander to protect two ‘astronauts’ when they land. The lander must be able to carry a ‘cabin’ containing the ‘astronauts’ and land upright when dropped without damage to the lander or loss of astronauts.

    E-Textiles

    Students are introduced to the developing world of E-Textiles where electronics are incorporated into sportswear that can measure, track and feedback information to assist the wearer. They are introduced to basic electronics and build a simple circuit that can be embedded into a rucksack through the project context.

    Context: E-textiles is emerging as an asset in technical clothing.

    • Can you sample a basic circuit that can be incorporated into a rucksack?

    Chocolate mould

    Students learn about the vacuum forming process, food packaging design & the promotion of chocolate through this exciting project. They learn about plastics, moulding and forming, before creating their own shape and packaging. The project culminates with students making their chocolate design for them to eat.

    Context: Food manufacturers must make important decisions about how they package food products to sell to make them not only appealing and informative but also sustainable and suitable for use.

    • Can you design and make a new packaging in order to showcase a new range of chocolate?
  • Year 8

    DT

    Context: It is widely recognised that our environment has an effect on our mental health. For example, feng shui (pronounced fung shway) is an ancient Chinese system of balancing our physical environment to promote harmony and a sense of well-being. Many of us spend time indoors working, studying or relaxing at home.

    • Can you improve a living, working or learning space by creating a small storage/display solution?

    As part of this module students will gain an understanding of the importance of design and the wider consequences that this can have on an individual and on society, students will look at how high-quality design can contribute to a positive health and wellbeing.

    The module also includes learning about: 

    • About the materials used to make products
    • About the iterative design process
    • How to investigate a design context and design problems
    • How to explore design solutions through sketching and modelling
    • How to use CAD(computer aided design) such as 2D design
    • How to use CAM(computer aided manufacture) machines
    • Such as the laser cutter and the 3D printer
    • How to test and evaluate your ideas and products against a specification

    DT Textiles

    Context: The rise of plastics in our oceans is a huge concern for us all.

    • Can you design and create a printed sustainable bag?

    The module develops and supports the school's vision of creating students that are responsible, resilient and reflective. It develops their awareness of the provenance of synthetic fibres and sustainability in terms of plastics and their pollution, focusing on 2 of the 6 R’s; refuse and rethink.

    Students develop their understanding of 3D structures and their relationship with the 2D shape through the analysis of existing products; pattern drafting, lay planning, cutting out and manufacturing using a variety of machinery and equipment.

    Students develop their understanding of printing techniques and create their own repeat using CAD to be incorporated onto their bag.

    Through the revisiting of health and safety in the workshop, the law and BSI students build on the textile techniques they have individually used in Y7 developing their fine motor skills in printing techniques.

    Food Preparation and Nutrition

    Context: When preparing and buying meals it can be challenging to find foods that provide a balance of nutrients.

    • Can you plan dishes which focus on incorporating specific nutrients into the diet?

    As part of their work with food, pupils will be taught how to cook and apply the principles of nutrition and healthy eating. Instilling a love of cooking in pupils will also open a door to one of the great expressions of human creativity. Learning how to cook is a crucial life skill that enables pupils to feed themselves and others affordably and well, now and in later life. This includes:

    • Understanding and application of the principles of nutrition and health
    • Cooking a repertoire of predominantly savoury dishes so that they are able to feed themselves and others a healthy and varied diet
    • Becoming competent in a range of cooking techniques (for example, selecting and preparing ingredients; using utensils and electrical equipment; applying heat in different ways; using awareness of taste, texture and smell to decide how to season dishes and combine ingredients; adapting and using their own recipes)
    • Understanding the source, seasonality and characteristics of a broad range of ingredientsYear 8

    DT+

    The DT+ modules in Design and Technology include 3-week modules that introduce important aspects that underpin other areas of the subject. In these modules' students have the opportunity to design and make using software, tools, equipment and machinery. Developing their awareness, abilities and appreciation for the designed world. In Y8 our DT+ is broken down into three projects;

    Structures- Designing Bridges

    Context: As humans continue to have a significant impact on the environmental stability of the earth, it is becoming evident to see that global warming is having a significant impact on the extreme weather conditions that are occurring on our planet. Heavy rainfall and flash floods have recently seen roads and bridges washed away, leaving towns and villages isolated and making any travel or access to emergency services very difficult.

    • Can you design an innovative flat pack bridge that can be assembled quickly in times of emergency?

    Communication - Drawing in 3D

    Context: It is important to communicate our ideas to others clearly on paper.

    • Can you learn to draw in 3D using isometric and a range of skills so that you can communicate your ideas clearly to others?

    The best designers use a variety of a variety of tools and techniques to convey their thoughts and ideas. It takes practice and experience to master these skills. As we become more able to communicate our concepts on paper, we should consider who we are communicating them too and how else we can make our design work talk.

    Food and Nutrition – Hello Fresh

    Context: When preparing and buying meals it can be challenging to find foods that provide a balance of nutrients.

    • Can you plan dishes which focus on incorporating specific nutrients into the diet?

    With a focus on health and wellbeing, provenance and sustainability, students explore UK food provision relating to the growth market of cook at home/ fresh meal kits. They design a 2-course meal for Hello Fresh, considering the health and wellbeing of consumers (in line with NHS recommendations and guidance and the provision of specific nutrients), the provenance (source) of food ingredients, as well as ingredient sustainability. Students will develop product costing skills, keeping within a budget of £5 per portion or less.

    Students will put together and present Hello Fresh style sheets for their dishes, including an ingredients list, step by step making instructions, product visualisation, costing and nutritional information / labelling (created by them using an online nutrition analysis tool).

  • Year 9

    DT

    Context: As the world continues to manufacture products from raw materials it is important to know where resources are from and if they are damaging the environment.

    Understanding where materials come from and how they can be used is an important part of protecting our environment. Students will also get the opportunity to apply their knowledge and skills by designing and creating a solution to enhance the biodiversity of their local environment. This will also include:

    • Learning about biodiversity and the impact that a consumer society has on natural resources and the environment.
    • Being able to describe biodiversity and understand what the effect loss of habit will have for plants, animals, and other organisms.

    DT Textiles

    Context: Designer trends and influences. Making fashion today accessible to all.

    In Y9 students work to develop their appreciation and understanding of a wide range of issues surrounding the fashion industry from trends and influences, concept ideas, working with design briefs and specifications, on to manufacturing specifications. They develop their understanding of important design topics such as life cycle analysis and a circular economy whilst exploring techniques and processes to create a unique adaptation of a plain white t-shirt before testing and evaluating against their brief and specification to establish what went well and even better if.

    Food Preparation and Nutrition

    Context: Appreciating and understanding where food comes from and how it behaves when we cook with it is important.

    • Learning about biodiversity and the impact that a consumer society has on natural resources and the environment.

    As part of their work with food, pupils will be taught how to cook and apply the principles of nutrition and healthy eating. Instilling a love of cooking in pupils will also open a door to one of the great expressions of human creativity. Learning how to cook is a crucial life skill that enables pupils to feed themselves and others affordably and well, now and in later life. This includes:

    • Understanding and application of the principles of nutrition and health
    • Cooking a repertoire of predominantly savoury dishes so that they are able to feed themselves and others a healthy and varied diet
    • Becoming competent in a range of cooking techniques (for example, selecting and preparing ingredients; using utensils and electrical equipment; applying heat in different ways; using awareness of taste, texture and smell to decide how to season dishes and combine ingredients; adapting and using their own recipes)
    • Understanding the source, seasonality and characteristics of a broad range of ingredients

    DT+

    The DT+ modules in Design and Technology include 3-week modules that introduce important aspects that underpin other areas of the subject. In these modules' students have the opportunity to design and make using software, tools, equipment and machinery. Developing their awareness, abilities and appreciation for the designed world. In Y9 our DT+ is broken down into three projects:

    Engineering Electronics

    Context: The development of the microcontroller had a significant impact on electronic products.

    Within this module, you will develop an understanding of what a microcontroller is and how this is used in everyday products that we often take for granted. You will get the opportunity to use software to develop your programming skills and test this against a real-world scenario.

    Food and Nutrition - Packaging

    Context: Food manufacturers have to make important decisions about how they package food products. Packaging protects foods and helps prevent food waste but, is it easy to use for all users?

    Students are challenged to research a specific user group to find out their needs and requirements and use this information to redesign an item of food packaging to make it accessible to all users.

    DT - Design Challenge

    Context: Students are challenged to design a new product for the Design Museum Shop

    The Design Museum in London showcases exhibitions from past and present designers looking at iconic and influential design. Design Ventura works alongside the Design Museum to challenge young people in the real world of design. Students are given a brief and a user group. In teams they are to take on different roles and work together to solve the given problem.

Top

Key Stage 4

Key Stage 4 for our students begins in Year 10. Each set getting two periods a week. We offer a variety of GCSE courses in order to cater for the individual learning needs of our students.

Open All Close All

  • Year 10 Year 11

    Design & Technology AQA (8552) Timbers / Textiles

    This new GCSE will run as two courses. Students will be allowed to study their material of choice either Timbers or Textiles. All students will be required to study the core technical principles below.

    The new GCSE places greater emphasis on understanding and applying iterative design processes. Students will use their creativity and imagination to design and make prototypes that solve real and relevant problems, considering their own and others' needs, wants and values.

    Our GCSE allows students to study core technical and designing and making principles, including a broad range of design processes, materials techniques and equipment. They will also have the opportunity to study specialist technical principles in greater depth.

    Core technical principles

    In order to make effective design choices students will need a breadth of core technical knowledge and understanding that consists of:

    • new and emerging technologies
    • energy generation and storage
    • developments in new materials
    • systems approach to designing
    • mechanical devices
    • materials and their working properties

    All of this section must be taught and all will be assessed.

    Specialist technical principles

    In addition to the core technical principles, all students should develop an in-depth knowledge and understanding of the following specialist technical principles:

    • selection of materials or components
    • forces and stresses
    • ecological and social footprint
    • sources and origins
    • using and working with materials
    • stock forms, types and sizes
    • scales of production
    • specialist techniques and processes
    • surface treatments and finishes

    Each specialist technical principle should be delivered through at least one material category or system. Not all of the principles outlined above relate to every material category or system, but all must be taught. The categories through which the principles can be delivered are:

    • papers and boards
    • timber based materials
    • metal based materials
    • polymers
    • textile based materials
    • electronic and mechanical systems

    Designing and making principles

    They will need to demonstrate and apply knowledge and understanding of designing and making principles in relation to the following areas:

    • investigation, primary and secondary data
    • environmental, social and economic challenge
    • the work of others
    • design strategies
    • communication of design ideas
    • prototype development
    • selection of materials and components
    • tolerances
    • material management
    • specialist tools and equipment
    • specialist techniques and processes

    Examination

    What's assessed

    • Core technical principles
    • Specialist technical principles
    • Designing and making principles

    How it's assessed

    • Written exam: 2 hours
    • 100 marks
    • 50% of GCSE

    Questions

    • Section A – Core technical principles (20 marks): A mixture of multiple choice and short answer questions assessing a breadth of technical knowledge and understanding.
    • Section B – Specialist technical principles (30 marks): Several short answer questions (2–5 marks) and one extended response to assess a more in depth knowledge of technical principles.
    • Section C – Designing and making principles (50 marks): A mixture of short answer and extended response questions.

    Non Examined Assessment

    Practical application of:

    • Core technical principles
    • Specialist technical principles
    • Designing and making principles
    • 30–35 hours approx
    • 100 marks
    • 50% of GCSE

    The NEA is a substantial design and make task

    Assessment criteria:

    • Identifying and investigating design possibilities
    • Producing a design brief and specification
    • Generating design ideas
    • Developing design ideas
    • Realising design ideas
    • Analysing & evaluating
    • In the spirit of the iterative design process, the above should be awarded holistically where they take place and not in a linear manner
    • Contextual challenges to be released annually by AQA on 1 June in the year prior to the submission of the NEA
    • Students will produce a prototype and a portfolio of evidence
    • Work will be marked by teachers and moderated by AQA

    Engineering (AQA 8852)

    The sky's the limit. Engineering is an increasingly innovative and exciting area to work in. It affects every aspect of modern life – from skyscrapers to smart phones, cars to carrier bags. Our new GCSE introduces students to a host of new technologies, helping them to gain practical skills and understanding to inspire a lifelong interest in engineering. It will particularly appeal to those who enjoy being creative, with an affinity for drawing, design, maths and problem-solving.

    Whilst this is a new qualification, you’ll see we've kept much of the popular content and topics that we know you like. We've also maintained the clear structure to our assessment using a mixture of question styles, giving all your students the opportunity to demonstrate their knowledge and understanding.

    Core content

    1. Engineering materials
    2. Engineering manufacturing processes
    3. Systems
    4. Testing and investigation
    5. The impact of modern technologies
    6. Practical engineering skills

    Assessments

    Question paper: Externally assessed

    What's assessed

    Sections 1–6 from the subject content.

    Though the 'Practical engineering skills' section will predominantly be assessed through the NEA, some questions in the written exam will relate to practical contexts and students will need to apply their understanding within these contexts.

    How it's assessed

    • Written exam: 2 hours
    • 120 marks
    • 60% of GCSE

    Questions

    • Multiple choice questions assessing breadth of knowledge
    • Short answer questions assessing in depth knowledge, including calculations
    • Multiple choice questions related to the application of practical engineering skills
    • Extended response questions drawing together elements of the specification

    Non-exam assessment: Practical engineering

    What's assessed

    • Application of skills, knowledge and understanding in a practical context
    • Analysis and evaluation of evidence

    How it's assessed

    • A brief set by AQA released on 1 June in the first year of study.
    • 80 marks
    • 40% of GCSE

    Questions - Students produce:

    • engineering drawings or schematics to communicate a solution to the brief
    • an engineering product that solves a problem

    Food Preparation & Nutrition (AQA 8585)

    Our GCSE in Food Preparation and Nutrition develops the knowledge, understanding and skills required to cook and apply the principles of food science, nutrition and healthy eating.

    The majority of the course is delivered through preparation and making activities. Students are able to make the connections between theory and practice to apply their understanding of food and nutrition to practical preparation.

    The topics covered are:

    1. Food, nutrition and health
    2. Food science
    3. Food safety
    4. Food choice
    5. Food provenance

    Examination (1 hour 45 mins): Paper 1: Food preparation and nutrition

    • Multiple choice questions (20 marks)
    • Five questions each with a number of sub questions (80 marks)

    What's assessed:

    Theoretical knowledge of food preparation and nutrition from:

    • Food, nutrition and health
    • Food science
    • Food safety
    • Food choice
    • Food provenance

    This is worth 50% of the GCSE

    Non-exam assessment (controlled assessment)

    What's assessed:

    • Task 1: Food investigation: Students' understanding of the working characteristics, functional and chemical properties of ingredients.
      Practical investigations are a compulsory element of this NEA task.
    • Task 2: Food preparation assessment: Students' knowledge, skills and understanding in relation to the planning, preparation, cooking, presentation of food and application of nutrition related to the chosen task.
      Students will prepare, cook and present a final menu of three dishes within a single period of no more than three hours, planning in advance how this will be achieved.

    How it's assessed

    • Task 1: Written or electronic report (1,500–2,000 words) including photographic evidence of the practical investigation.
    • Task 2: Written or electronic portfolio including photographic evidence. Photographic evidence of the three final dishes must be included.

    This is worth 50% of the GCSE

Top

Key Stage 5

At Key Stage 5 the faculty offers four courses. Each teaching group has five single periods of lessons per week.

Open All Close All

  • Year 12 Year 13

    Engineering 

    BTEC Level 3 National Certificate in Engineering – Pearson Qualification 

    This qualification is equivalent in size to one A Level and is taught over 360 GLH (Guided Learning Hours). It comprises of 4 units of which 3 are mandatory and one optional unit chosen by the centre. Two of the units are externally assessed and two are internally assessed.

    Unit 1: Engineering Principles (External exam) will enable learners to apply mathematical and physical science principles to solve electrical-, electronic- and mechanical-based engineering problems.

    Unit 2: Delivery of Engineering Processes Safely as a Team (Internally moderated project). In this unit, you will examine common engineering processes, including health and safety legislation, regulations that apply to these processes and how individual and team performance can be affected by human factors. You will learn the principles of engineering drawings and develop two-dimensional (2D) computer-aided drawing skills while producing orthographic projections and circuit diagrams. Finally, you will work as a team member and team leader to apply a range of practical engineering processes to manufacture a batch of an engineered product

    Unit 3 Engineering Product Design and Manufacture (Externally moderated project) will allow you to put into practice what you know about materials, processes and engineering principles. This externally assessed piece requires you to problem solve a given brief in timed sessions.

    Unit 10: Computer Aided Design in Engineering (Internally moderated project)
    This unit is internally assessed unit will develop the essential skill of producing a variety of CAD drawings, from 2D engineering drawings to 3D rendered presentations.

    A Level: Fashion and Textiles (AQA)

    What will I learn on this course?

    The course is designed to:

    • develop a broad view of fashion and textiles
    • develop the capacity to design and make fashion products
    • appreciate the complex relations between design, materials, manufacture and marketing, developing their confidence to succeed in a number of careers, especially those in the creative industries

    How will I be assessed?

    • AO1: Identify, investigate and outline design possibilities to address needs and wants
    • AO2: Design and make prototypes that are fit for purpose
    • AO3: Analyse and evaluate: Design decisions and outcomes, including for prototypes made by themselves and others wider issues in design and technology
    • AO4: Demonstrate and apply knowledge and understanding of: Technical principles; Designing and making principles

    Assessment weightings

    Assessment objectives Paper 1 Paper 2 NEA Overall
    AO1     15% 15%
    AO2     25% 25%
    AO3 7.5% 7.5% 10% 25%
    AO4 17.5% 17.5%   35%
    Overall weighting of components 25% 25% 50% 100%

    What can I do after this course?

    This qualification is accepted at all institutions of higher education relating to design and manufacture.

    What careers would this course be useful for?

    Fashion Designer / Buyer, Costume Designer, Pattern Drafter, Retail and Marketing.


    A Level: Product Design (AQA)

    What will I learn on this course?

    The course is designed to:

    • develop a broad view of design and technology
    • develop a real understanding of what it means to be a designer
    • appreciate the complex relations between design, materials, manufacture and marketing

    How will I be assessed?

    Candidates study and work with a variety of materials and components used in the design and making of everyday products. They work in both two and three dimensional forms. Candidates gain an understanding of industrial and commercial practices within the area of design and manufacture:

    • Paper 1 (25%) will examine students on their knowledge of core technical principles of materials and their application, designing and making
    • Paper 2 (25%) will examine specialist subject knowledge through product analysis and understanding of commercial manufacture

    The non-exam assessment (NEA) (50%) will allow students to apply their knowledge through practical application. Using the core principles of designing and making, they will identify a need, research, design and make a product to satisfy a real problem.

    What can I do after this course?

    This qualification is accepted at all institutions of higher education relating to design and manufacture.

    What careers would this course be useful for?

    Product designer; design engineer; architecture; CAD draughts person; automotive design, graphic designer, manufacturing and engineering; biomedical engineer


    Level 3 Diploma: Food Science and Nutrition (WJEC)

    What will I learn on this course?

    The Level 3 Food Science and Nutrition qualifications allow students to gain a wealth of knowledge about the food and nutrition industry. Students will have the opportunity to learn about the relationship between the human body and food as well as practical skills for cooking and preparing food.

    How is the course delivered?

    The WJEC Level 3 Diploma in Food Science and Nutrition is made up of four units:

    • Unit 1: Meeting the Nutritional Needs of Specific Groups (mandatory) – 1.5hr examination and a controlled assessment assignment in Year 12
      This mandatory unit will enable students to demonstrate an understanding of the science of food safety, nutrition and nutritional needs in a wide range of contexts, and through on–going practical sessions, to gain practical skills to produce quality food items to meet the needs of individuals. The purpose of this unit is for students to develop an understanding of the nutritional needs of specific target groups and plan and cook complex dishes to meet their nutritional needs.
    • Unit 2: Ensuring Food is Safe to Eat (mandatory) – Controlled Assessment Year 13
      The second mandatory unit will allow students to develop their understanding of the science of food safety and hygiene; essential knowledge for anyone involved in food production or wishing to work in the food industry. Practical sessions will support the gaining of theoretical knowledge and ensure learning is a tactile experience. Students will develop an understanding of hazards and risks in relation to the storage, preparation and cooking of food in different environments and the control measures needed to minimise these risks. From this understanding, students will be able to recommend the control measures that need to be in place, in different environments, to ensure that food is safe to eat.
    • Unit 3: Experimenting to Solve Food Production Problems (optional) – Controlled Assessment Year 13
      The aim of this unit is for students to use their understanding of the properties of food in order to plan and carry out experiments. The results of the experiments would be used to propose options to solve food production problems.
    • Unit 4: Current Issues in Food Science and Nutrition (optional) – Controlled Assessment Year 13
      Through this unit, you will develop the skills needed to plan, carry out and present a research project on current issues linked to issues related to food science and nutrition. This could be from the perspective of a consumer, food manufacturer, caterer and/or policy-making perspective.

    All learners must take units 1 and 2 and then select either unit 3 or unit 4.

    What careers would this course be useful for?

    Together with relevant Level 3 qualifications such as AS and A Levels in Biology, Chemistry, Sociology and Maths, learners will gain the required knowledge to progress to higher education degree courses, such as:

    • BSc Food and Nutrition
    • BSc Human Nutrition
    • BSc (Hons) Public Health Nutrition
    • BSc (Hons) Food Science and Technology

    An understanding of food and nutrition is relevant to many industries and job roles. Care providers and nutritionists in hospitals use this knowledge, as do sports coaches and fitness instructors. Hotels and restaurants, food manufacturers and government agencies also use this understanding to develop menus, food products and policies that that support healthy eating initiatives. Food and drink is the largest manufacturing sector in the UK.

    Many employment opportunities within the field of food and nutrition are available to graduates including:

    Food Technology, Food Marketing, Food Product Development, Dietetics, Nutrition, Teaching, Catering, Nursing, Hotel Management, Environmental Health, Social Health, Sports science

Top

Teaching staff

The Design and Technology faculty benefits from creative and innovative staff. Many have a subject specialism to help drive ambition within our students.

  • Thompson, Stuart (Head of the Technology Faculty - Food Preparation and Nutrition)
  • Tattersall, Jane (Assistant Curriculum Leader - Design and Technology: Textiles; Fashion and Textiles)
  • Walshaw, Clare (Assistant Curriculum Leader - Engineering; Product Design) 
  • Birch, Debbie (Design and Technology: Timbers)
  • Davies, Joanne (Food Preparation and Nutrition)
  • Wilders, Faye (Food Preparation and Nutrition)
  • Griffith, Vincent (Engineering)
  • Shaw, Richard (Engineering)
  • Swindell, Rachel (Design and Technology: Timbers / Textiles; Product Design; Fashion and Textiles)

Top

Support staff

The role of the faculty support staff is vital in that they support the learning and teaching activities within the faculty ensuring all our students' needs are met. All technicians bring valuable skills to the faculty that help our students achieve their potential.

  • Pigott, Richard (Food Preparation and Nutrition)
  • Platts, Shirley (Food Preparation and Nutrition)
  • White, Richard (Design and Technology)
  • Ryan, Charlotte (Design and Technology)
  • Goodhew, Lisa (Food Preparation and Nutrition)

Top